Sustainability Series: WE ARE THE RADICAL MONARCHS

Watch Trailer Director: Linda Goldstein Knowlton

 

Available to watch November 2nd – 4th, 2020

Post-show Zoom discussion at 8:30PM on Wednesday, Nov 4th

 

How to watch

Watch free films from the Fall Sustainability Series lineup and participate in virtual discussions from home!

To participate, please register for each event using the registration below. An email will be delivered to you when the film becomes available to stream, containing a link to watch and a link to the Zoom discussion. All Zoom discussions will take place on Wednesdays at 8:30 p.m. Registrants will have access to films in advance, though we recommend viewing the films on the day of the panel discussion.

About the film

A group of tween girls chant into megaphones, marching in the San Francisco TransMarch. Holding clenched fists high, they wear brown berets and vests showcasing colorful badges like “Black Lives Matter” and “Radical Beauty.” Meet the Radical Monarchs, a group of young girls of color at the front lines of social justice.

Set in Oakland, a city with a deep history of social justice movements, WE ARE THE RADICAL MONARCHS documents the Radical Monarchs – an alternative to the Scout movement for girls of color, aged 8-13. Its members earn badges for completing units on social justice including being an LGBTQ ally, the environment, and disability justice. The group was started by two, fierce, queer women of color, Anayvette Martinez and Marilyn Hollinquest as a way to address and center her daughter’s experience as a young brown girl. Their work is anchored in the belief that adolescent girls of color need dedicated spaces and that the foundation for this innovative work must also be rooted in fierce inter-dependent sisterhood, self-love, and hope.

The film follows the first troop of Radical Monarchs for over three years, until they graduate, and documents the Co-Founders struggle to respond to the needs of communities across the US and grow the organization after the viral explosion of interest in the troop’s mission to create and inspire a new generation of social justice activists.

About the series

Athena Cinema, University Libraries and Environmental Studies Program present the 8th annual Sustainability Film Series. For the first time ever, the series will be presented virtually.

In keeping with all previous series, each film will be followed by a panel discussion featuring faculty members, students and community members.

Please join us for a conversation following these beautiful, thought-provoking and timely films.

“These young people are saying we all have a right to know what is in the air we breathe, in the water we drink, and the food we eat. It is our responsibility to leave this planet cleaner and greener. That must be our legacy.”

— Representative John Lewis on youth climate activists, September 2019

The fall screenings highlight new releases and classic films that explore diverse topics with the central theme of racial and social justice. We choose films that engage and challenge the audience to integrate the information from these stories into their everyday life, as well as delve into solutions. Through the series we aim to bring together students, faculty and regional community members. The program recognizes the strength of this integration, coming together and learning from each other.

The series is possible thanks to the support of: Voinovich School of Leadership and Public Affairs, OHIO Honors Program, Honors Tutorial College, Cutler Scholars, Climate Ambassadors,  Office of Sustainability, Southeast Ohio Public Energy Council, Center for Campus & Community Engagement, University College, and others.

Free admission and post-show discussion, as part of the Fall Virtual Sustainability Series.

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Running Time: 95 min95 MIN
This Film is Wheelchair Accessible

Goldstein Knowlton presents a vibrant view of the Oakland community, using radio news soundbites for context to track the organization's growth from the age of Obama and the shadow of Ferguson to the foreboding specter of Donald Trump.

Kevin Crust
Los Angeles Times